Illinois company recalls more than 30 tons of beef for E. coli

For the second time in three months, this problem was discovered during traceback activities in response to sample testing by FSIS. According to the new recall notice, the meat company shipped the implicated beef nationwide for further distribution and processing.

“There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to the consumption of these products”, according to the recall notice posted by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

“FSIS is concerned that some product may be in institutional facility freezers. Institutions who have purchased these products are urged not to use them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.”

The recalled raw beef was produced and packaged on April 19. They have the establishment number “EST. 788” printed inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The recall notice included a spreadsheet of the products subject to the recall, as well as a PDF with recalled raw beef product Labels.

Click to view additional products subject to this recall.

Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider. E. coli O157: H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhoea and abdominal cramps. Symptoms can begin in 48 hours but may take more than a week to develop. While most people recover within a week, some develop life-threatening infections and complications, including a type of kidney failure, called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition is most common in children younger than 5 years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor and decreased urine output. People who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume meat that has been cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees F. The only way to confirm that beef is cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures the internal temperature.